1. Tell me about yourself
    Tip: This may go for a few minutes (1-3 minutes). You may discuss your education, volunteer, shadowing and work experiences. You may also give a little background on where you came from, etc. During the interview, make good eye contact, sit up straight, and look happy to be participating in the interview ☺
  2. Why Medicine and not nursing or any other health related fields?
    Tip: Make sure you emphasize that you want to help serve mankind. You may consider the roles/tasks of doctors in hospitals and explain why you want to engage in such roles/tasks compared to other roles. You may also consider your work/volunteering/shadowing experiences in answering. Display passion and enthusiasm on why you want to be a physician.
  3. If you really want to work with or help people, why not social work
    Tip: You may consider characteristics of medicine that enable you to help people and engage in other activities such as scientific/clinical research, that may not be feasible in other fields such as social work.
  4. Where and when in your life did you have an experience or moment that made you think you wanted to become a physician?
  5. Why did you choose to apply to our school?
    Tip: Give concrete reasons as to why you chose to apply to the school. You may state certain areas of strength of the school and how you are interested in those areas; you may state its curriculum, etc. You may research this on the school’s website. Display enthusiasm on why you chose to apply to the school.
  6. Why did you choose to study your undergraduate or graduate major?
    Tip: Provide concrete and logical reasons. Don’t give cliché’s or something like this “I did biology because it is more related to medicine and many students tend to do it” Instead, state how you are passionate about this major and how you feel this major can help you in being a great medical doctor.
  7. Is there anything you would change about your undergrad?
  8. What was your favorite undergraduate or graduate course/class and why?
  9. What happened the semester(s) your grades were low?
    Tip: Make sure you are aware of the semesters your grades were low and be able to provide solid reasons as to why they were low. Make sure you explain how you have learnt from the experience and how you made efforts to improve. You may also consider how the experience may be an added advantage to your success in medical school.
  10. Why is your MCAT score low? How did you improve your MCAT score that much?
    Tip: Make sure you are honest about your MCAT scores. If you believe the score is not reflective of your actual potential, point that out to the interviewer. Even if your MCAT score was low, it is important to describe or show that you still put in a lot of effort on the MCAT.
  11. Please discuss some of your volunteering and clinical experiences.
    Tip: Be brief. Explain what you did, how you did it, what you learnt, and how that has impacted or stimulated you in pursuing medicine.
  12. Please discuss some of your research experiences.
    Tip: Be brief. Make sure you know exactly what you did, how you did it, the results you got, and the meaning, significance, or implication of your research results. Prepare on discussing your research experiences. Express your knowledge on the research. Don’t be too detailed initially, give a basic outline, but if interviewer asks more questions you may delve into it a little more.
  13. How do you think your academic and clinical experiences have prepared you for a career in medicine?
    Tip: Think of how your experiences may be related to medicine or being a great doctor. These may consist of certain skills or lessons you learnt
  14. How do you prepare to cope with the workload of medical school?
  15. What will you bring to our school and student body?
    Tip: Think of how you may add value to the medical school or student body. “What do you possess that will benefit the school?” is basically the question. Sell yourself.
  16. Could you name someone who has influenced your life the most? Why?
  17. What are your strengths and weaknesses?
    Tip: Describe strengths, skills, or competencies important in being a great doctor e.g. great communication and listening skills, strong commitment to patients, time management, great clinical acumen, etc. Concerning your weaknesses you may consider qualities that at your best are strengths, but sometimes are also challenges. For example, “I like to take the initiative in carrying out certain tasks, but sometimes I find it challenging because I tend to take on too many tasks” Also describe how you have taken efforts in addressing your weaknesses.
  18. What medical specialty interests you and why?
    Tip: Hematology? Dermatology? Family Medicine? Neurology? Oncology? Urology? Cardiology? Anesthesiology? Rheumatology? Radiology? etc. Be able to describe what the specialty entails, why you want to pursue it, and events or experiences that have impacted you in pursuing the specialty.
  19. Tell me about a time you took the initiative in learning or carrying out a task or a time you carried out self-directed learning
    Tip: It is important to think this through because medical schools are interested in applicants who seek information or learning that is independent of a formal or organized institution.
  20. What do you think of our Health Care System/Medicine today? What do you think of the idea of Universal Health Care? If you had the power, what changes will you make?
  21. What recent advancement in medicine has occurred that you believe will have the greatest impact on patient care or medicine as a whole? What do you think is the most pressing medical issue today?
    Tip: It is important to stay up to date on new advancements and information in the medical and healthcare field. Any question could be posed during the interview. You may consider the usage of the internet and information technology on medicine, advancements in medical research, less invasive techniques used in surgery, robotics surgery, etc. You may consider reading medical journals, publications, newspapers, online news and blogs, etc.
  22. Name three qualities you believe are the most important qualities in being a great medical doctor?
    Tip: You may consider some key skills or qualities such as solid knowledge base, exceptional communication skills, compassion and empathy for patients, strong commitment and dedication to patients, time-management skills, problem-solving skills, great clinical acumen or judgment, etc.
  23. Do you think doctors make too much money?
  24. If you were a doctor and a pregnant under-age girl asked you for an abortion pill and she did not want to tell her parents, what would you do?
    Tip: For ethical questions, there is no right or wrong answer. Interviewers want you to look at both sides of the issue. You don’t need to tell interviewer what he/she/they want to hear, express your own opinion. Display great understanding and thoughtfulness on the questions. For ethical questions, you must always remember the responsibilities of physicians to help guide your answer. These may serve as basis to help answer your ethical questions. The “Best” answers are the ones that put the patient’s well being above other things. Also, be consistent in your response.
  25. Would you prefer to provide less effective medicine to more people or more effective medicine to fewer people?
  26. Do you believe that doctors should be allowed to “pull the plug” on terminally ill patients?
    Tip: For ethical questions, there is no right or wrong answer. Interviewers want you to look at both sides of the issue. You don’t need to tell interviewer what he/she/they want to hear, express your own opinion. Display great understanding and thoughtfulness on the questions. For ethical questions, you must always remember the responsibilities of physicians to help guide your answer. These may serve as basis to help answer your ethical questions. The “Best” answers are the ones that put the patient’s well being above other things. Also, be consistent in your response.
  27. What are you most proud of and what are you least proud of?
  28. Where else did you apply? Have you been accepted somewhere? Which school is your first choice?
    Tip: If you give some information on the schools you applied or got accepted, it is important for you to re-iterate how important it is for you to get accepted into the medical school you currently are interviewing for. You may even state that it is your first choice. You want to show the school that you are highly committed to their medical program.
  29. Why should we choose you over other applicants? Convince me that you will be a great doctor
    Tip: Sell yourself without being “cocky” or arrogant. You may consider how you have demonstrated strong academic achievements, unique clinical or health care experiences, and other details that will impress the interviewer and increase your chances of being accepted.
  30. What will you do if you are not accepted into Medical School?
    Tip: Medical schools are looking for students who are highly committed to medicine. It will be helpful to explain that you will address areas of your application you believe prevented you from being accepted (e.g. MCAT scores) and then re-apply. You may also state that you will ask the schools for recommendation on ways to improve your next application.
  31. You are taking a medical school exam and find your friend or classmate cheating, what will you do?
  32. What will you do about a patient who is in constant pain, asking you how he/she can end his/her life?
    Tip: You may state that the question is about euthanasia/physician assisted suicide. You may consider the pros and cons of euthanasia. You may explain that you will try to talk with the patient, minimize pain, and improve life quality. It is important to put the patients well being above all other things. This is an ethical question. You may follow the tips on ethical questions stated above
  33. How will you handle a patient who is not able to pay for your care?
  34. What will you do if a parent refuses a controversial but life-saving procedure or treatment for his/her child, maybe because of religious beliefs?
    Tip: For questions like this, there aren’t any right answers. But make sure you show that your stance is well thought of. Make sure that you express empathy, strong reasoning skills, and your understanding of “first do no harm” This is an ethical question. You may follow the tips on ethical questions stated above.
  35. What are your thoughts on human cloning and research on human subjects?
  36. If you made a mistake as a physician, how would you handle it?
    Tip: It is important to display honesty and disclose the mistake being made. It is important to consider both sides of the issue, e.g. disclosing a mistake may undermine patient’s views of doctors, bring up lawsuits, or save patient’s life. Again, this is an ethical question, express your opinion. You may follow tips provided above. It is important to put patient’s life first or above all other things.
  37. How do you intend to pay for medical school?
  38. How would your friends describe you? How would your professors describe you?
  39. How do you handle stress?
    Tip: Stress type questions are posed to determine if you are able to cope with the rigorous activities of medical school and the medical career. Note that some interviewers may introduce stress into the interview to see how you react. You may be posed controversial or confrontational questions to see your reaction. Be calm and professional.
  40. What do you expect to be doing 10 years from now? What are your lifelong goals?
    Tip: Make sure you give this much thought. You may not have an exact answer for where you will be 10 years, but make sure you provide a logical and reasonable answer that pertains to the medical career or being a physician.
  41. If someone were to write a book about you 30 years from now, what would you want to be included in the book?
  42. How do you spend your time outside of the classroom? What are your hobbies?
    Tip: What do you like? Your interests, passions, etc. Nature? Sports? Reading? Hanging out and meeting people, etc. They are trying to see if you are well-rounded.
  43. Any Questions
    Tip: It is important to ask some questions after or during the interview. This shows your interest in the program. Make sure you do not ask questions that can be easily answered by the school’s website. To be on the safe side, do not bring up controversial questions.

NOTE: These are very relevant questions that may help in the interview. Questions may be asked in a random fashion. Questions not included on this page may be asked during the interview.